Music Industry Panel Debate

Next Tuesday, March 3, from 7:00-9:00 PM in the School of Management auditorium I am moderating a panel discussion–titled “What Lies Ahead”–on the future of the music industry. Audience Q & A will follow the moderated discussion.   For more information see the event website or the poster below.  Register for the event by joining the Facebook group.


2 thoughts on “Music Industry Panel Debate

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  2. This sounds like a great event I look forward to attending. One major issue I look forward to hearing about is the law in regards to sharing music over the internet. A huge phenomenon these days is spreading leaked music to dedicated music blogs prior to official release dates. One question is how is music getting leaked in the first place? Record labels seem to not be doing a job protecting their music. In most situations, the label, artist, producers and engineers are the only ones with access to the recordings. Are labels keeping an eye on all the parties mentioned above to prevent a leak?

    I produce music and recently had the opportunity to work with a high-profile artist on a record being released on a major label, for which I will remain nameless out of respect. Although I was warned several times to be careful with the song (as I have all recording files and can easily make an mp3 to leak), I never signed a contract forbidding me.

    Usually when a label sees there music leaked they will either ask all the major blog sites to take it down, or let it go. Leaked music has become so common it almost has become part of the process, and there is speculation that the labels themselves are to blame for leaked music due to the free marketing it creates. What actions are labels taking to regulate this activity? How can you hold individuals liable for such leaks with the anonymous nature of the Internet?

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