Cyberbullying Jury

The Missouri jury that acquitted Elizabeth Thrasher on a felony charge of cyberbullying said the prosecutors proved every element of the crime, save one:  proof of the victim’s emotional harm.  The victim testified that after Thrasher posted the victim’s photos, cell phone number, and other personal information on a Craigslist “casual encounters” site she received phone calls, texts, and photos from men who seen the posting, and that one man came to the restaurant where she worked.  The victim also testified that she feared being raped and killed.  This first-person testimony was not enough for the jury; they wanted third-party testimony to corroborate the victim’s emotional distress.  The prosecutors did not think their case required more testimony on the victim’s harm:  “We didn’t feel it was necessary to go on any further to prove what comes out of her mouth based on the assumption that most people would be distressed to have their personal information put on Craigslist.”

2 thoughts on “Cyberbullying Jury”

  1. I think her actions were unacceptable and that the average person would be emotionally traumatized by what she did. I don't agree with this judgment. Regardless of whether or not the two events are linked, there should be some sort of price that she has to pay.

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