McCain’s Judgment II

A post two weeks ago about the selection of Sarah Palin asked whether McCain was serious.  The pundits view the selection as a success because it invigorated the McCain campaign.   “Ordinary Americans” like Palin because she is “just like us.”  That’s the problem.  I don’t want a President and Vice President who are just like us.  I want elected leaders who are more knowledgeable, more thoughtful, better-read, and more in tune with the world’s complexities than us.  We’ve had eight years of one of the worst administrations in history led by someone “ordinary Americans” can relate to.  Having a New York Times editorial echo these thoughts is small comfort since the “ordinary Americans” who’ve embraced McCain and Palin don’t take their cues from the Times.  Others, though–the “extraordinary Americans”–see that the emperor has no clothes.  I called Palin’s selection “a cynical, craven capitulation to the far right [that} underscores the  deep flaws in McCain’s judgment.”  The Times said it “raises profound questions about his judgment.” I said “[t]his decision is bold only in the context of politics as a game.”  The Times said “[i]f the choice was, as we suspect, a tactical move, then it was shockingly irresponsible.”  Palin’s scripted, non-substantive, shallow–how can anyone take seriously someone who claims insight into Russia because it’s visible across the Bering Strait?–make her shortcomings painfully obvious.  If McCain were CEO of a public company and he promoted to second in command a person so obviously lacking in knowledge about the business the shareholders would have his head, the second’s physical resemblance to Tina Fey notwithstanding.  (Fey nailed Palin’s appeal in Saturday’s opening sketch on Saturday Night Live.)   I’d laugh at McCain’s buffoonery if the stakes were not so high.

PS:  Bob Herbert’s Op-Ed 9/12 Times Op-Ed piece

3 thoughts on “McCain’s Judgment II”

  1. Calling her “hockey mom-turned-vice president” is getting a bit old. I’m not sure why being a governor makes her a less qualified candidate for president (let alone VP) than being a junior senator makes Obama qualified to be president.

    The biggest joke of this campaign, in my humble opinion, has been Obama’s “plan” to create 5 million “green” jobs. A little conservative math shows how ridiculous the statement is:

    6% unemployment x 300,000,000* americans =
    18 million unemployed people.

    5 million / 18 million = 27.7%

    So his plan promises to cut the unemployment rate by AT LEAST 25%???

    Wow…he’s definitely getting my vote. He should campaign in Europe a little more to get the poll numbers back in his favor.

    *Assumes EVERY HUMAN BEING IN THE US IS QUALIFIED TO BE EMPLOYED (toddlers, children, senior citizens, etc.)

  2. So far Palin has not impressed anyone amid all the criticism she’s received. It’s sad. She really is like Dan Quayle.

    My friend, a Republican, thinks that the GOP should tank this election because the circumstances are so dire. Whichever party takes office now is going to be up a creek. He thinks that Obama will try and ultimately fail, or just not succeed in changing anything and there’s going to be a total realignment in 2012 when Bobby Jindal will supposedly run.

    Interesting theory.

    Is the economy and the war and everything else too much for anyone to handle? That’s a scary idea.

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